• Recherche

À ce jour, 43 études ont été menées sur le mécanisme d’action unique de la RiboCéine et son effet général sur la production endogène du glutathion. Les liens suivants mènent à des sites de recherche tiers qui hébergent ces études évaluées par des pairs et publiées.


  1. Roberts, J.C.; Nagasawa, H.T.; Zera, R.T.; Fricke, R.F.; Goon, D.J. W. Prodrugs of L-cysteine as protective agents against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. 2-(polyhydroxyalky)-and 2-(Polyacetoxyalky)-Thiazolidine-4(R)-Carboxylic Acids. J. Med Chem. 1987, 30, 1891-1896.
  2. Roberts, J.C.; Francetic, D.J.; Zera, R.T. L-cysteine prodrug protects against cyclophosphamide urotoxicity without compromising therapeutic activity. Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology 1991, 28, 166-170.
  3. Roberts, J.C.; Francetic, D.J. Time course for the elevation of glutathione in numerous organs of L1210-bearing CDF1 mice given the L-cysteine prodrug, RibCys. Toxicology Letters, 1991, 59, 245-251.
  4. Roberts, J.C.; Francetic, D.J. Mechanisms of Chemoprotection by RibCys, a Thiazolidine Prodrug of L cysteine. Med. Chem. Res., 1991, 1, 213-219.
  5. Roberts, J.C.; Charyulu, R. L.; Zera, R.T.; Nagasawa, H.T. Protection Against Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Ribose-Cysteine (RibCys). Pharmacology & Toxicology, 1992, 70, 281-285.
  6. Rowe, J.K.; Zera, R.T.; Madoff, R.D.; Fink, A.S.; Roberts, J.C.; Johnston, G.R.; Freeney, D.A.;Young, H.L.; Bubrick, M.P. Protective Effect of RibCys Following High-Dose Irradiation of the Rectosigmoid. Dis. Colon Rectum, 1993, 36(7), 681-687.
  7. Roberts, J.C.; Francetic, D.J.; Zera, R.T. Chemoprotection against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Urotoxicity: Comparison of Nine Thiol Protective Agents. AntiCancer Research, 1994, 14, 389-396.
  8. Carroll, M.P.; Zera, R.T.; Roberts, J.C.; Schlafmann, S.E.; Feeny, D.A.; Johnston, G.R.; West, M.A.; Bubrick, M.P. Efficacy of Radioprotective Agents in Preventing Small and Large Bowel Radiation Injury. Dis. Colon Rectum, 1995, 38(7), 716-722.
  9. Roberts, J.C.; Koch, K.E.; Detrick, S.R.; Warters, R.L.; Lubec G. Thiazolidine Prodrugs of Cysteamine and Cysteine as Radioprotective Agents. Radiation Research, 1995, 143, 203-213.
  10. Bantseev, V.; Bhardwaj, R.; Rathbun, W.; Nagasawa, H.T.; Trevithick, J.R. Antioxidants and Cataract: (Cataract Induction in Space Environment and Application to Terrestrial Aging Cataract). Biochem. Mol. Bio. Intl., 1997, 42, 1189-1197.
  11. Roberts, J.C.; Phaneuf, H.L.; Szakacs, J.G.; Zera, R.T.; Lamb, J.G.; Franklin, M.R. Differential Chemoprotection against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity by Latentiated L-Cysteines. Chem. Res. Toxicol., 1998, 11, 1274-1282.
  12. Roberts, J.C.; Phaneuf, H.L.; Dominick, P.K.; Wilmore, B.H.; Cassidy, P.B. Biodistribution of [35S] – Cysteine and Cysteine Prodrugs: Potential Impact on Chemoprotection Strategies. J. Labelled Cpd. Radiopharm., 1999, 42, 485-495.
  13. Lucus, A.M.; Henning G.; Dominick, P.K.; Whiteley, H.E.; Roberts, J.C.; Cohen, S.D. Ribose Cysteine Protects Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatic and Renal Toxicity. Toxicologic Pathology, 2000, 28(5), 697-704.
  14. Wilmore, B.H.; Cassidy, P.B.; Warters, R.L.; Roberts, J.C. Thiazolidine Prodrugs as Protective Agents against γ-Radiation-Induced Toxicity and Mutagenesis in V79 Cells. J. Med. Chem., 2001, 44(16), 2661-2666.
  15. Lenarczyk, M.; Ueno, A.; Vannais, D.B.; Kraemer, S.; Kronenberg, A.; Roberts, J.C.; Tatsumi, K.; Hei, T.K.; Waldren, C.A. The “Pro-drug” RibCys Decreases the Mutagenicity of High-LET Radiation in Cultured Mammalian Cells. Radiation Research, 2003, 160, 579-583.
  16. Waldren, C.A.; Vannais, D.B.; Ueno A.M. A role for long-lived radicals (LLR) in radiation-induced mutation and persistent chromosomal instability: counteraction by Ascorbate and RibCys but not DMSO. Mutation Research. 2004, 551:255-265.
  17. Lucas Slitt, A.M.; Dominick, P.K.; Roberts, J.C.; Cohen, S.D. Effect of Ribose Cysteine Pretreatment on Hepatic and Renal Acetaminophen Metabolite Formation and Glutathione Depletion. Basic Clin. Pharmacol. Toxicol., 2005, 96 (6), 487-94.
  18. Oz, H.S.; Chen, T.S.; Nagasawa, H., Comparative efficacies of 2 cysteine prodrugs and a glutathione delivery agent in a colitis model. Translational Research, 2007, 150(2), 122-129.
  19. Jurkowska, H.; Uchacz, T.; Roberts, J.; Wrobel, M. Potential therapeutic advantage of ribose-cysteine in the inhibition of astrocytoma cell proliferation. Amino Acids, 2011 41, 131-139.
  20. Walker R.B., Everette J.D. Comparative Reaction Rates of Various Antioxidants with ABTS Radical Cation. J. Agric Food Chem. 2009:57:1156-1161.
  21. Heman-Ackah, S.E.; Juhn, S.K.; Huang, T.C.; Wiedmann, T.S. A combination antioxidant therapy prevents age-related hearing loss in C57BL/6 mice. Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 2010, 143, 429-434.
  22. Kader, T.; Porteous C.M.; Williams M.J.A.; Gieseg, S.P.; McCormick, S.P.A. Ribose-cysteine increases glutathione-based antioxidant status and reduces LDL in human lipoprotein(a) mice. Atherosclerosis. 2014, 237, 725-733.
  23. Saltman A.E. D-Ribose-L-cysteine supplementation enhances wound healing in a rodent model. Am J Surg. 2015, 210, 153-158.
  24. Falana B, Adeleke O, Orenolu M, Osinubi A, Oyewopo A. Effect of D-ribose-L-cysteine on aluminum induced testicular damage in male Sprague-Dawley rats. JBRA Assisted Reproduction. 2017:21(2):94-100.
  25. Joseph D.B., Olayemi O.S., Falana B.A., Duru F.I.O. Osinubi A.A.A. D-Ribose-L-Cysteine Maintained Testicular Integrity in Rats Model (Rattus Novergicus) Exposed to X-Ray. Nuclear Medicine. 2017(2)4:20-26.
  26. N’guessan B.B., Amponsah S.K., Dugbartey G.J., Awuah K.D., Dotse E., Aning A., Kukuia K.K.E., Asiedu-Gyekye I.J., Appiah-Opong R. In Vitro Antioxidant Potential and Effect of a Glutathione-Enhancer Dietary Supplement on Selected Rat Liver Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Activity. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. 2018:7462839:8 pages.
  27. Awodele O, Badru W.A., Busari A.A., Kale O.E., Ajayi T.B., Udeh R.O. Emeka P.M. Toxicological evaluation of therapeutic and supra-therapeutic doses of Cellgevity on reproductive function and biochemical indices in Wistar rats. BMC Pharmacology and Toxicology. 2018:19:68.
  28. Cukrov D., Newman T.A.C., Leask M., Leeke B., Sarogni P., Patimo A., Kline A.D., Krantz I.D., Horsfield J.A., Musio A. Antioxidant treatment ameliorates phenotypic features of SMC1A-mutated Cornelia de Lange syndrome in vitro and in vivo. Human Molecular Genetics. 2018:27:17:3002-3011.
  29. Osinubi A.A.A, Medubi L.J., Akang E.N., Sodiq L.K., Samuel, T.A., Kusemiju T., Osolu J., Madu D., Fasanmade O. A comparison of the anti-diabetic potential of D-ribose-L-cysteine with insulin, and oral hypoglycaemic agents on pregnant rats. Toxicology Reports. 2018(5):832-838.
  30. Emokpae O, Ben-Azu B, Ajayi AM, Umukoro S. D-Ribose-L-Cysteine attenuates lipopolysaccharide-induced memory deficits through inhibition of oxidative stress, release of proinflammatory cytokines, and nuclear factor-kappa B expression in mice. Naunyn-Schmiedeberg’s Archives of Pharmacology. 07 January 2020.
  31. Kader T., Porteous M., Jones G., Dickerhof N., Narayana V.K., Taraknath S., McCormick S.P.A. Ribose-Cysteine protects against the development of atherosclerosis in apoE-deficient mice. PLoS ONE 15(2): e0228415. 02 21 2020.
  32. Emokpae O, Ben-Azu B, Ajayi AM, Umukoro S. D-Ribose-L-Cysteine enhances memory task, attenuates oxidative stress and acetyl-cholinesterase activity in scopolamine amnesic mice. Drug Dev Res. 2020;1-9
  33. Amponsah S.K., N’guessan B.B, Akandawen, A.A., Agboli S.Y., Danso, E.A., Opuni K.F.M., Asiedu Gyekye I.J., Appiah-Opong, R. Effect of Cellgevity Supplementation on Selected Rat Liver Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Activity and Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Carbamazepine. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Volume 2020 (July 3), Article ID: 7956493, 8 pages.
  34. Okoh, L., Ajayi, A.M., Ben-Azu, B., Akinluyi, E.T., Emokpae, O., Umukoro, S. D-Ribose-L-Cysteine exhibits adaptogenic-like activity through inhibition of oxido-inflammatory responses and increased neuronal caspase-3 activity in mice exposed to unpredictable chronic mild stress. Molecular Biology Reports. 2020 47:7709-7722.
  35. Ogunlade, B., Gbotolorun S.C., Ogunlade, A.A. D-Ribose-L-Cysteine modulates lead acetate-induced hematobiochemical alterations, hormonal imbalance, and ovarian toxicity in adult female Wistar rats. Drug and Chemical Toxicology. November 7, 2020; 1-8.
  36. Ogunlade, B., Fidelis, O.P., Afolayan, O.O., Agie, J.A. Neurotherapeutic and antioxidant response of D Ribose-L-Cysteine nutritional dietary supplements on Alzheimer-type hippocampal neurodegeneration induced by cuprizone in adult male wistar rate model. Food and Chemical Toxicology. November 11, 2020; 1-9.
  37. Oludare, G.O., Afolayan, G.O., Semidara, G.G. Potential anti-toxic effect of d-ribose-l-cysteine supplement on the reproductive functions of male rats administered cyclophosphamide. J. Basic Clin Physiol Pharmacol. 2021 Feb 8.
  38. Ojetola, A.A., Adedeji, T.G., Fasanmade, A.A. Changes in antioxidants status, atherogenic index and cardiovascular variables after prolonged doses of D-ribose-L-cysteine in male Wistar rats. Heliyon 7 (2021) e06287.
  39. Medubi, L.J., Nwosu, N.C., Medubi, O.O., Lawal, O.R., Ama, C., Kusemiju, T.O., Osinubi, A.A.A. Increased de novo glutathione production enhances sexual dysfunctions in rats subjected to paradoxical sleep deprivation. JBRA Assisted reproduction. September 30, 2020; 1-8.
  40. Verrilli, A.M, Leibman, N.F., Hohenhaus, A.E., Mosher, B.A. Safety and efficacy of a ribose-cysteine supplement to increase erythrocyte glutathione concentration in healthy dogs. AJVR. 2021; 82(8). 653- 658.
  41. Ogunlade, B., Adelakun, S.A., Ukwenya, V.O., Elemoso, T.T. Potentiating response of D-Ribose-L Cysteine on Sodium arsenate-induced hormonal imbalance, spermatogenesis impairments and histomorphometric alterations in adult male Wistar rat. JBRA Assisted Reproduction. 2021; 25(3): 358- 367.
  42. Ojetola, A.A, Adeyemi, W.J., David, U.E., Ajibade, T.O., Adejumobi O.A., Omobowale, T.O., Oyagbemi, A.A., Fasanmade, A.A. D-ribose-L-cysteine prevents oxidative stress and cardiometabolic syndrome in high fructose high fat diet fed rats. J.Biopha. 2021 (142) 112017.
  43. Akingbade G.T., Ijomone O.M., Imam A., Aschner M., Ajao M.S. D-Ribose-l-Cysteine Improves Glutathione Levels, Neuronal and Mitochondrial Ultrastructural Damage, Caspase-3 and GFAP Expressions Following Manganese-Induced Neurotoxicity. 2021 Sep 4. doi: 10.1007/s12640-021- 00404-3. pp 1-13.

La RiboCéine est le résultat de 25 années de recherche scientifique et a été développée par le Dr. Herbert T. Nagasawa, le chercheur et chimiste médicinal de renommée mondiale, et son équipe de chercheurs à l’Université du Minnesota et au VA Medical Center.

Le Dr. Herbert T. Nagasawa


«Le glutathion se trouve dans chaque cellule pour une bonne raison. Il est le maître antioxydant de la cellule et protège chaque cellule contre les dommages résultant du stress oxydatif.»

Dr. Herbert T. Nagasawa, PhD, Professeur de Chimie Médicinale à l’Université du Minnesota, Chercheur Scientifique Principal de Carrière à la VA (Administration des Anciens Combattants).

Pendant plus de 45 ans, le Dr Herbert Nagasawa a travaillé à faire progresser les domaines de la chimie biochimie et de la chimie médicinale, notamment en créant un antidote contre l’empoisonnement au cyanure. révolutionnaire. Le Dr Nagasawa a consacré toute sa vie à la recherche de moyens plus efficaces pour soutenir la production du glutathion dans les cellules, en mettant l’accent sur le développement de promédicaments de substances biologiquement actives, y compris celles d’origine endogène. Dans sa recherche d’un moyen plus avancé de délivrance de cystéine par rapport à la NAC, son équipe et lui-même ont inventé la molécule de RiboCéine.

Le Dr Nagasawa a reçu son diplôme B.S. en Chimie à la Western Reserve University (aujourd’hui, Case-Western Reserve) à Cleveland, dans l’Ohio, et un doctorat en Chimie Organique à l’Université du Minnesota. Par la suite, il a passé deux ans en tant que boursier postdoctoral en Biochimie à l’Université du Minnesota avant de rejoindre le personnel de recherche du V.A. Medical Centre (Centre Médical des Vétérans) de Minneapolis au Minnesota en tant que Chimiste Principal.

Il a été nommé Professeur Adjoint de Chimie Médicinale à l’Université du Minnesota en 1959, puis Scientifique Principal du VAMC en 1961. Il a été promu en 1963 Professeur Associé de Chimie Médicinale, puis Professeur en 1973. En 1976, le Dr Nagasawa a été promu au poste de Chercheur Scientifique de Carrière Principal, un titre national national aux scientifiques de haut niveau de l’Administration des Anciens Combattants.

Bien que retraité aujourd’hui, le Dr Nagasawa continue d’être un membre du corps professoral en tant que Professeur Auxiliaire au sein des Centers for Drug Design de l’Université du Minnesota.

Dr. Jeanette Roberts, M.P.H.

La Dre Roberts a obtenu son diplôme B.S. en Biochimie à Albright College à Reading, Pennsylvanie et son doctorat en Chimie Médicinale à l’Université du Minnesota. Elle a servi quinze ans au Département de Pharmacie de l’Université de l’Utah, quatre ans en tant que Professeur à la Division des Sciences Pharmaceutiques de l’Université du Wisconsin, puis onze ans en tant que Doyenne de la School of Pharmacy à l’UW. Elle a également été Directrice de l’UW Madison Center for Interprofessional Practice and Education. En tant qu’étudiante diplômée, la Dre Roberts a travaillé directement avec le Dr Nagasawa et a rédigé sa thèse de doctorat sur le développement de la RiboCeine.

L’Équipe Scientifique

Le Dr. Scott Nagasawa

Scott Nagasawa, docteur en Pharmacie, a une histoire à succès en tant que Vice-Président des Services Professionnels pour un fournisseur national de pharmacies et, plus tard, a été copropriétaire de la Regional Home Infusion Pharmacy. Avant de se joindre à Max, il était le Directeur Technique de la start-up Cellgevity, fondée par lui-même, son frère Stuart Nagasawa, docteur en Médecine, Scott Momii et le Dr Herbert Nagasawa. Ensemble, ils ont développé le produit révolutionnaire qui est devenu aujourd’hui le plus populaire des compléments de Max. Scott a obtenu son doctorat en Pharmacie à la University of Southern California (USC). En tant que Directeur des Services Pharmaceutiques pour un grand hôpital universitaire de Los Angeles, en Californie, il a occupé les postes d’Instructeur Clinique de Pratique Pharmaceutique et de Professeur Adjoint de Pratique Pharmaceutique à l’USC.

Scott Momii, M.B.A.

Scott a obtenu un diplôme B.A. à San Jose State University et un diplôme M.B.A. à Boston University, et a suivi un programme d’été en entrepreneuriat à Sophia University à Tokyo, au Japon. Il a été à la fois Directeur Général d’une société de recherche, de développement et de fabrication de produits chimiques spécialisés et Directeur de la Logistique d’une société de biotechnologie qui développait des vaccins et autres thérapies anticancéreuses. Ses responsabilités comprenaient la fabrication et le contrôle de la qualité, la supervision et la mise en œuvre de programmes de vente et de marketing, ainsi que le service à la clientèle et la comptabilité.

Si vous êtes un(e) Professionnel(le) en Médical(e) ou en Soins de Santé intéressé(e) à visualiser notre bibliothèque de vidéos de Symposium Médicaux, cliquez ici pour les regarder.